Humankind

“Wild animals are less wild and more human than many humans of this world” 

Munia Khan

A friend posted the word “humankind” today on Facebook followed by, “try being both.”

What has happened to our world?   

Yes, another mass shooting happened this last weekend. What scared me the most Saturday was the fact I was no longer shocked as I read the breaking news banner pasted on the front of my phone. A confirmed mass shooting at a Pittsburg synagogue. These tragedies have become as every day as the latest wild-fire or category 5 hurricane. We have become numb and almost anesthetized.

As I walked into my office, I looked out our front door and saw this beautiful buck relaxing in the shade.

Thank you, God, for sharing this magnificent animal with me at this moment. His calm gaze gave me great peace.  Thank you.

As I began reading quotes for today’s story, I kept reading passages attributed to L.R. Knost. I had no idea who this person was but I certainly agreed with what s/he had to say.

I discovered L.R. Knost is a young author and mom who lives in Florida with her husband and four of her six children. She is a well published author with several of her books cited in the short article: Two Thousand Kisses a Day, Whispers Through Time, The Gentle Parent, and Jesus, the Gentle Parent.

I could not decide on which quote to share so I decided to share several.

“Healing a hurting humanity starts with a sacred pause, to listen, to learn, to understand, to accept, to forgive, to respect. That sacred pause transcends the fear-driven brutality of the primitive human survival instinct and makes way for a thoughtful, intentional, peaceful, humane response. Peaceful coexistence on this lovely planet is not impossible. It is imperative. Our future, our humanity, our very survival depends on it.” 

L.R. Knost

“I know the concern over the events in our nation doesn’t end at our borders. Because there are no borders, really, if you think about it. Everything we do on this planet has repercussions that reverberate around the world. Because we’re connected. We belong to each other. And we need each other. We will get through this. Together. And we’ll learn and grow and overcome. Together. I believe the good things in this world outnumber the sad. And I believe the good people outnumber the bad. We are the lights sparkling in the darkness, and our hope and love are going to set the world on fire. I believe in us.” 

L.R. Knost

“Do not be hardened by the pain 

and cruelty of this world. 

Be strong enough to be gentle, 

to be soft and supple like running water, 

gracefully bending around sudden turns, 

lithely waving in strong winds, 

freely flowing over sharp rocks, 

all the while quietly sculpting 

this hard world into ever deeper beauty, 

gently eroding rigid rock into silken sand,

tenderly transforming human cruelty 

into human kindness. 

Remember, true strength is not found in the stone, 

but in the water that shapes the stone.” 

L.R. Knost

I am…

B…simply being…

God bless.

~Peace be with you.~

 

 

 

 

 

Mother Nature

Yesterday started out quickly and dramatically in Hibdonville.

My husband, Michael, was out watering the plants. I was sleepily wandering into the kitchen when I heard some unusual sounds coming from the backyard. I was a little slow realizing that what I was hearing was serious–a pretty big error on my part.

To understand this tale better, I need to tell you that we live between two small communities in the hill country of Texas. We are not in town but we are not really in the country. We have undeveloped lots around us, which gives us the chance to observe some wild life: raccoons, foxes, occasional coyotes, many birds, including our favorite, the road runner and our least favorite, a very LOUD nocturnal bird called, Chuck Will’s Widow, many feral cats, and quite a few deer. The weather this Spring has been exceptional with new babies arriving daily. The fawns visit at least once a day,  jumping and running through the lots, making us laugh at their antics and marvel at their speed and dexterity. The two new litters of feral kittens provide hours of pure entertainment. We are not cat people so it’s taken awhile for the cats to work their way into our hearts. They have been very successful. So much so Michael named the newest members. The oldest litter of three: Moe, Larry, and Curly. The newest litter of two: Thelma and Louise.

Yesterday, tiny Larry enlarged his circle of exploration a little to far. The sounds I heard earlier came from behind a very large and dense persimmon bush. Larry either crawled under or through our fence. On our side of the fence stood our very gentle Lhasa Apso, Duffy. He had been watching patiently, anxiously awaiting the arrival of what I think he saw as the best new toy ever. A toy he grabbed excitedly, carrying the tiny white bundle further behind the shrubbery.

As fellow dog owners know, trying to take a toy away from your dog often does not go well or quickly. This was the case yesterday. It did not end well for Larry. We were devastated.

This left me wondering if there was anything I could do to prevent this from happening again? I cleaned around the perimeter of the fence, putting rocks in places where I thought something could crawl under. I walked away at the end of the day feeling I had probably discouraged something from crawling under the fence, but any small animal could still crawl through. I had done what I could. I needed to acknowledge that and let it go.

Sigh.

I did not see any kittens today. My guess is both mama cats moved their little ones further away from the newly perceived “danger zone.” Even though I miss seeing them, I hope they are away until they get a little bigger and a lot more street smart.

Mother Nature can be hard to understand sometimes. I’m just a “town kid” trying to figure it all out. I do realize I cannot fix it all and know I have a lot more to learn.

I am…

B…simply being…

Peace